Vintage imponderables

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  1. #1

    Vintage imponderables

    Two questions that have been bugging me lately:

    Recoil has some strange double gun with a long strap, does it fit in a special way on the figure?

    http://www.yojoe.com/action/89/recoil.shtml

    Beachhead has something on his left shoulder, what is it supposed to be? Maybe his hat, folded and tucked under an epaulet?

    http://www.yojoe.com/action/04/beachhead6.shtml

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  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by cageyJG
    Two questions that have been bugging me lately:

    Recoil has some strange double gun with a long strap, does it fit in a special way on the figure?

    http://www.yojoe.com/action/89/recoil.shtml

    Beachhead has something on his left shoulder, what is it supposed to be? Maybe his hat, folded and tucked under an epaulet?

    http://www.yojoe.com/action/04/beachhead6.shtml
    I think that is a stock, and not a strap on recoil's gun, and if you look at the original BH figure, the beret you are refering to is maroon, which is/was worn by airborne units on jump status. BH is a ranger, and I believe airborne is a big part of that.

  4. #3
    Beachhead does indeed have a coveted maroon beret on his shoulder. Although as an 80's Ranger he should have had a black one.
    Shawn Carden

    Rules to win a gunfight
    1. Bring your gun
    2. Invite your friends that have guns too
    3. Don't fight fair

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  6. #4
    I had a friend who as a kid who claimed it was a bloody rag because Beachhead had been shot in the shoulder.
    ~Pit-Viper~

  7. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by cardensb
    Beachhead does indeed have a coveted maroon beret on his shoulder. Although as an 80's Ranger he should have had a black one.
    I bet he does have a Black one somewhere, but carries his maroon beret cause nobody was going to be stupid enough to take it from him.

  8. #6
    In 1951, the Marine Corps experimented with green and blue berets, but dismissed them because they looked too “foreign” and “feminine.”
    LOL

    Troops of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., started wearing the maroon beret in 1973, while at Fort Campbell, Ky., the trend exploded, with post personnel wearing red, military police donning light green, and the 101st Airborne Division taking light blue as their color. In Alaska, the 172nd Infantry Brigade began using an olive green beret.
    source:

    http://usmilitary.about.com/cs/gener...rethistory.htm

    OTOH, maybe beachy is a huge prince fan

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...6101143773778#
    Last edited by chadzx11; 04-28-2010 at 09:55 AM.

  9. #7
    Appreciate all the info. Feel free to add.

    Next one: In the early 80s, were any soldiers/marines anywhere still wearing bandoliers or slinging machine-fed cartridges around their shoulders like Rock & Roll? The only application where I can see that would be handy would maybe be with shotgun shells.

    Also, how are grenades carried nowadays? Dangling from combat web-gear like all the '82 - '83 Joes? I always liked how they had those standard suspenders & everyone got a grenade and blade. Scarlett had throwing stars and a grenade. Awesomeness.
    Last edited by cageyJG; 04-28-2010 at 11:07 AM.

  10. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by chadzx11
    It's interesting how, like the beret, world militaries adopt common organizational clothing through history. I think you can trace a lot of the diffusion to western trade & colonialism, and countries wanting to adopt something that would make them look similar or gain more street cred.

    I thought the scene in Patton was hilarious when he said, "I once designed a tanker's uniform in all red." Like a crimson guardsman?

  11. #9
    Rock-n-Rolls ammo belts is impractical. First he had to pull a round out of the link than relink them into the belt. To load them he has to break the links again and reseat the bullet or toss it aside. They would rattle, poke and be really shiny. Linked ammo is carried in pouches and bags more like the bag Big Ben's grenade pouches were carried in. Even M249 SAW ammo drums are normally carried in pouches. We have cloth pouches that are designed to carry linked ammo and keep it straight. If the ammo is left loose, it can jar loose, rounds can get caught under the rest of the belt, twists can break the belt open... The key to being a good gunner, is organized, easily accessible ammo.
    Grenade carry - In the 80's and 90's the M16 magazine pouch had two loops on them, one on each side. Grenades fit into those cloth loops and are held in place by a small buttoned strap. Of course the pineapple style grenade went out style in Korea. The 80's grenade is baseball shaped with a fuse, spoon and pin.
    We never hang grenades by the pins like you see, that is extremely unsafe. Knives on the straps was fairly common back then but they were usually opposite your firing side since the case could get in the way of shouldering your rifle. Also the knives tended to interfere with the backpack carrying straps. Personally, I wore a K-bar on my pants belt and it rode just below my TA-50's "web" belt. I rarely wore my assigned bayonet on the gear, I tossed it in my pack. When the command got all uptight about belt knives, I would put it outside my pack in the space between a front pouch and the main compartment and wore my bayonet on the gear.
    Standard web gear for a rifleman was two ammo pouches up front to carry 6x magazines (210 rds) and 4x grenades; two 1x quart canteen pouches One on each hip), a first aid pouch (often on a shoulder strap upside down so the dressing would fall out when opened one handed) and a compass pouch. Bayonets were supposed to be worn. Leaders usually had a radio on the belt too. Whatever space that was left on the belt filled up with extra pouches for stuff we wanted to carry on our person. As a rifle platoon leader I wore 2x SAW pouches instead of rifle pouches so I could carry 6x mags in one pouch and the other carried maps, map markers, map protractors, cord, flex cuffs, smoke grenades, food, whatever... When we wore body armor, I used the elastic straps to hold flares in their cases around my body too. I usually wore a buttpack that carried socks, a rain jacket and a some meal parts of MREs. If my night vision goggles were not around my neck, they may be in the buttpack.

    Now that we have been at war for almost 9 years, that gear is largely obsolete. We wear more modular pouches on body armor, use camelbacks instead of canteens.
    Shawn Carden

    Rules to win a gunfight
    1. Bring your gun
    2. Invite your friends that have guns too
    3. Don't fight fair

  12. #10
    A+ ! Very interesting to read.

    So much gear to keep organized - I don't know how people stow their gear but that's a lot of stuff to keep in good order and ready to go quickly.

    O.k., so ammo is mostly worn on the hips... oh, and what is the deal with all the funny looking loops on modern body armor? They are arranged in columns of like 10 or so that are arranged vertically down the middle or down both sides.

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