Remove yellowing from plastics.. fix found.

yojoe.com

Page 1 of 18 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 177
  1. #1

    Remove yellowing from plastics.. fix found.

    Hello everyone...

    I purchased a G1 JetFire for my son not too long ago and found when I received it that it was yellow, a common problem I found out. I got online and started doing some research and looked at couple different tricks out there... none seem very promising.. So I set out to find a way to remove the yellow. My degree is in chemistry which gave me access to a lab... after many, many hours of work and countless failures I finally had success in removing all the "yellow" out of the plastic without damaging it. Below are some images of my success... currently I am working with a patent attorney on filing for a patent for the process. So I can't say much about it other than you would place the parts in a solution for about 30 min and then remove them. My reason for posting is to ask a question(s).. Would you buy a product that would remove the "yellow" from old plastic? How much would this be worth to you? What items would you recommend I try it on?



    here are some images..












    I have tried it on may other items with success... I will post more pix later if anyone is interested.
    Last edited by myst32yt; 08-18-2011 at 12:44 PM.

  2. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    all over in the us navy!
    Posts
    71
    Is buy it and for what is pay well depends on the size for a gallon is like to pay no more than 15.

  4. #3
    Tolan
    Guest
    30 - 50% Hydrogen perioxde methods have been around for several years.

  5. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    I think it would be a great product if the price was kept low and could be found fairly easy at most retailers. It would be nice to dip some old storm shadows and make them white again.

    My question to the chemist is this: What is the duration of the whitening once complete? Is this something I would have to do a year later because the yellow comes back?

  7. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Tolan View Post
    30 - 50% Hydrogen perioxde methods have been around for several years.
    Right... we are trying to get the price below what 37% H2O2 costs... Plus ours works in about 30 min without the need of UV. As an added benefit ours will not burn you if you get it on your skin. BTW were are you getting 50% H2O2? I would be skeptical of anything over 37%, the legal limit that can be sold to the public in a pure form. Someone selling higher is probably mislabeling 37%.

  8. #6
    Is the process the same as the Peroxide method-immerse it in the solution? Thats been the reason I haven't tried it on my USS Flagg parts. They're just too darn big.
    Jason
    "You can do it, Grunt. You've got to do it, man." - Zap (Marvel #4)

    My wants

    ***/ (5#)####

  9. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by CrimsonGuardCommander View Post
    I think it would be a great product if the price was kept low and could be found fairly easy at most retailers. It would be nice to dip some old storm shadows and make them white again.

    My question to the chemist is this: What is the duration of the whitening once complete? Is this something I would have to do a year later because the yellow comes back?
    We are working on creating a passivation layer on the surface of plastic to protect it. However this will only offer UV protection for some limited time if exposed to constant UV rays. UV light is powerful stuff and given enough time will destroy whatever protection you put in place. Toys are made of relatively cheap plastics... expensive UV protection from chemicals like Benzophenone are not added. This may be due to planned obsolescence or just to keep the price down (or both).

    Currently our passivation layer is holding up.. but we have no real way to determine if it will hold up for 1, 2, or 15 years. The best bet is to keep any plastic toy out of direct sunlight. If you have an expensive collection in a room with a window, hire a company to install full UV filtered glass. Also install UV stop filters on all your light fixtures in the room or buy light bulbs made with UV filtered glass.

    Tesler 50-Watt MR-16 40 Degree UV Filter Halogen Light bulb | LampsPlus.com

    Hope this helps...

  10. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt View Post
    Is the process the same as the Peroxide method-immerse it in the solution? Thats been the reason I haven't tried it on my USS Flagg parts. They're just too darn big.

    We are currently working on 2 different methods to get around this problem.

    1. Sell in a paste so it can be painted on, then washed off. The paste is in development... For reasons having to do with surface area and kinetics it is difficult to get uniform results with a paste.

    2. Sell a concentrated form that the end user could then dilute with water in a large container. Though it looks like the USS Flagg, all put together, would not fit in a 55 gallon drum. Right now we can dilute up to 50% but parts would need to spend several hours in the solution for the full effect. This is due to the fact that water is so polar and solvates the active molecules of our chemical keeping them from reacting with the plastic. How big is the biggest part of the Flagg?

  11. #9
    To answer someone else's question: It works very well on vehicles, but on figures it does not work so well. The Stormshadow situation for example. It will discolor his emblem, and the "flesh" on his upper arms. Works really well for white vehicles and Transformers though, and you don't really need a high percentage hydrogen peroxide solution. You can just go grab the regualr old 8% from the drug/grocery store and either leave it in the sunlight for about a day, or use a blacklight. (this is in the case of extreme yellowing) I've seen things become white again in an hour that were not very yellowed using 8% hydrogen Peroxide.
    Last edited by CobraLALALALA; 08-18-2011 at 12:23 PM.

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by CobraLALALALA View Post
    This is a pretty old trick and I doubt you'll be able to patent hydrogen peroxide. good luck though.

    To answer someone else's question: It works very well on vehicles, but on figures it does not work so well. The Stormshadow situation for example. It will discolor his emblem, and the "flesh" on his upper arms. Works really well for white vehicles and Transformers though, and you don't really need a high percentage hydrogen peroxide solution. You can just go grab the regualr old 8% from the drug/grocery store and either leave it in the sunlight for about a day, or use a blacklight.
    Ours is not a H2O2 process... Your right, no one can patent that. Ours is a completely different way of doing it. H2O2 works by creating free radicals that attack the plastic (this is why you place it in a UV source. Free radicals are created in UV). Our process does not use free radicals.
    Last edited by myst32yt; 08-18-2011 at 12:43 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •